Mutiny
Mutiny

PRD Template

Product Requirement Documents help development teams ensure alignment and clarity as the project progresses. With a concise and user-friendly format, Mutiny's PRD template enables product development teams to stay on track and make informed decisions throughout the project lifecycle.

The Solution Alignment section guides teams in defining key features and outlining the plan of record. By drawing the boundaries of the solution space, teams can focus their efforts on filling it in with well-defined features. The template also includes sections for key flows, logic, launch plans, and milestones, enabling teams to map out the project's development and deployment stages comprehensively.

By providing a structured format for capturing project details, defining goals and non-goals, and outlining key features, the template promotes clarity, alignment, and successful project outcomes. With Mutiny's PRD template, teams can streamline their processes, foster collaboration, and drive project success.

PRD Template

[Project Name]

[one-line description]

Team: [Awesome]

Contributors: [PM], [Designer], [Engineer], [Analyst]

Resources: [Designs], [Analytics], [Notes]

Status: Draft / Problem Review / Solution Review / Launch Review / Launched

Last Updated: Thursday, May 21, 2020


Problem Alignment 

Describe the problem we are trying to solve in 1-2 sentences. I should be able to read this alone and communicate the value/risks to someone else.

  1. Why does this matter to our customers and business?
  2. What evidence or insights do you have to support this?

High Level Approach

Describe the rough shape of how we might tackle the problem. I should be able to squint my eyes and see the same shape. For example, if the problem was “discoverability of new features”, then this might be “a notification center for relevant features”. 

Narrative

Optional: Share (hypothetical) stories to paint a picture of what life looks like for customers today. Describe common and edgy use cases to consider when designing the solution. 

Goals

  1. Describe high-level goals, ideally in priority order and not too many.
  2. Include measurable (metrics) and immeasurable (feelings) goals
  3. Keep it short and sweet

Non-goals

  1. List explicit areas we do not plan to address
  2. Explain why they are not goals
  3. These are as important and clarifying as the goals
🛑 Do not continue if all contributors are not aligned on the problem. 
🟢 Complete the following table with “signatures” from all reviewers to move on. 
REVIEWER
TEAM/ROLE
STATUS

Solution Alignment 


✅ Draw the perimeter


🚫 Do not force others to identify scope

Key Features

Plan of record

  1. List the features that shape the solution
  2. Ideally in priority order
  3. Think of this like drawing the perimeter of the solution space
  4. Draw the boundaries so the team can focus on how to fill it in
  5. Link out to sub-docs for more detail for particularly large projects
  6. Challenge the size to see if a smaller component can be shipped independently

Future considerations

  1. Optionally list features you are saving for later
  2. These might inform how you build now

Key Flows

Show what the end-to-end experience will be for customers. This could be written prose, a flow diagram, screenshots, or design explorations. It will vary by project and team. Do not try to do this in isolation. Work with design and engineering to complete. 

It is natural for this section to become more specific over time. It might start as a few annotated screenshots or stories. It might become highly detailed requirements with acceptance criteria. Adjust to the way your team operates. If you have a strong designer who enjoys going into every edge case, lean on them. If you have detailed engineers who prefer to have each scenario documented, go deep on acceptance criteria. 

This will naturally change over time — that’s okay. When changes occur, document them in the Changelog and notify all contributors. 

Key Logic

  1. List rules to guide design and development
  2. Address common scenarios and edge cases
  3. It is often easier to write these out than rely on design to show every permutation
🛑 Do not continue if all contributors are not aligned on the problem. 
🟢 Complete the following table with “signatures” from all reviewers to move on. 
REVIEWER
TEAM/ROLE
STATUS

Launch Plan

Define the various phases that will get this product to market, the purpose of each phase, and the criteria you must meet to move on to the next one. Highlight risks and dependencies that can throw a wrench in timelines or progress (and ideally contingency plans). There is a table of example phases below. 

Key Milestones


TARGET DATE
MILESTONE
DESCRIPTION
EXIT CRITERIA
YYYY-MM-DD
✅ Pilot
Internal testing with employees only
No P0 or P1 bugs on a rolling 7-day basis
YYYY-MM-DD
🛑 Beta
Early cohort of 20 customers
At least 10 customers would be disappointed if we took it away
YYYY-MM-DD
🛑 Early Access
Invite-only customers from sales
At least 1 win from every major competitor
YYYY-MM-DD
🛑 Launch
All customers in current markets
Measure and monitor

Operational Checklist

TEAM
PROMPT
Y/N
ACTION (if yes)
Analytics
Do you need additional tracking?
Work with [person] on logging
Sales
Do you need sales enablement materials?
Work with [person]
Marketing
Does this impact shared KPI?
Work with [person] on goal adjustment
Customer Success
Do you need to update support content or training?
Work with [person] on updates
Product Marketing
Do you need a GTM plan? (e.g. pricing, packaging, positioning, 
Work with [person] with at least [x] weeks notice to kickoff workstreams
Partners
Will this impact any external partners?
Work with [person] on communication plan
Globalization
Are you launching in multiple countries?
Work with [person] 
Risk
Does this expose a risk vector?
Work with [person] 
Legal
Are there potential legal ramifications?
Work with [person] 

Appendix

Changelog

List key decisions or updates you make for future reference. Include who was involved and link to notes doc, if relevant. Recommend moving this up top once approved so changes are more visible. 

DATE
DESCRIPTION

Open Questions

Track open questions and answers here.

FAQs

Optional: Include an FAQ when helpful to answer high level questions so it is easier for people to grasp the point of the project without getting lost in the details of product definition. 

Impact Checklist

  1. Permissions
  2. Reporting
  3. Pricing
  4. API
  5. Global

Example PRDs

TK

Product Requirement Documents help development teams ensure alignment and clarity as the project progresses. With a concise and user-friendly format, Mutiny's PRD template enables product development teams to stay on track and make informed decisions throughout the project lifecycle.

The Solution Alignment section guides teams in defining key features and outlining the plan of record. By drawing the boundaries of the solution space, teams can focus their efforts on filling it in with well-defined features. The template also includes sections for key flows, logic, launch plans, and milestones, enabling teams to map out the project's development and deployment stages comprehensively.

By providing a structured format for capturing project details, defining goals and non-goals, and outlining key features, the template promotes clarity, alignment, and successful project outcomes. With Mutiny's PRD template, teams can streamline their processes, foster collaboration, and drive project success.

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